Do you take your dog(s) with you when you go walking?

Discussion in 'General Walking Discussions' started by LeeDonny, Oct 20, 2017.

  1. LeeDonny

    LeeDonny New Member

    I suppose this will partly depend on the age and fitness of your dogs, but assuming a fit and healthy dog do you generally take your dog along with you when you go on planned / longer walks or do you leave them at home or with family or friends?

    Perhaps there is some etiquette with regards to pets on group walks, I don't know?

    I'd be interested to hear from others about whether you take your dogs on walks and the sort of distances you cover?
     
  2. Glyder

    Glyder Regular Member

    Location:
    A peninsula
    I never did. He is a clumsy phobic hound, so getting him over gates and walls would have been a nightmare, plus he weighs 35Kg, so serious mtn walks were not for him. Lower level stuff yes but I have to watch him at lunch in case he goes off and snaffles sandwiches by sitting in front of people with pleading eyes.

    When he was younger I used to take him mtn biking, which he absolutely loved and I taught him to avoid the bike and run to heel on command. Same with running but he's nearly 10 now and whilst he'd still do it, he doesn't have the stamina and picks up injuries too easy, so it wouldn't be fair. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weaker.
     
    Spinney likes this.
  3. Gravity Aided

    Gravity Aided New Member

    I often take my dogs, but one is a harrier sort of mutt thing who can walk great distances, the other is an Elizabethan Beagle. The beagle is good at sprinting, but if the distance gets too far she will simply sit down and refuse to walk farther.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
    Spinney likes this.
  4. NorthernDave

    NorthernDave Member

    We used to walk anything up to 20 miles at a time with Chance, our Border Collie cross when he was young, but as he got older he slowed down to the point where in his last year or so he simply wasn't up to it.
    The Washburn Valley was always a favourite, and up into the Dales or on the Northumberland coast
    Screenshot_20171028-204710.png
    Sadly we lost him earlier this year.

    His replacement is a very different dog, in terms of size, temperament and walking ability.
    Being a Terrier cross he's got loads of energy, but only being a small dog he's had enough after 3 or 4 miles.
    IMG_20170712_114949828.jpg
    Still loves his walks though.
     
  5. Regulator

    Regulator Regular Member

    Jack will happily do walks of up to about 10 miles. After that he tends to get a bit refusenik.
     
    Gravity Aided and NorthernDave like this.
  6. Steve

    Steve Regular Member

    Location:
    Out and About
    A walk isn't a walk without the boys, they will do as much as I can do and more, being terriers they have no difficulty with stiles. Obviously need to make sure they are on leads around livestock but never had a problem, just need to take responsibility for them.
     
    NorthernDave likes this.
  7. oldfatfool

    oldfatfool Regular Member

    Three greyhounds and even the youngest wouldnt manage more than a couple of miles. They are made for speed in short bursts rather than endurance and once they have had enough just stop and expect carrying :laugh: contrary to general perception a couple of 15 mins walk a day and they have had enough.
     
    Steve and Rickshaw Phil like this.
  8. Spokey Dokey

    Spokey Dokey Regular Member

    My boy (Weimaraner) 'logged' over 200 mountain days until his unfortunate demise 6 years ago.

    He did Crib Goch, Striding Edge, Swirral Edge, CMD Arete etc, most on several occasions. He could scramble at a higher grade than these simple routes too. Obviously not vertical but with the occasional 'bum shove' (!) he loved rocky ascents.

    Here he is on top of Ben Nevis after a snowy CMD Arete ascent wearing his little descent harness. Across the Arete he was more securely 'tied on' with his big Ruffwear harness.

    In good summer conditions he just got on with it without being fettered - unless there was a danger of him knocking someone off!


    boosnow.jpg
     
  9. Drago II - the sequel

    Drago II - the sequel Regular Member

    I love Weimaraner's, handsome dogs.

    My dog (Lemmy, well known to those on the other side) is a field Labrador, a pedigree bred for shooting. He's actually pretty mild mannered and docile for a field lab, but he comes running with me, and often walks too. He needs the exercise, and the company is nice.
     
    NorthernDave and Spokey Dokey like this.
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